Timing of food intake is more potent than habitual voluntary exercise to prevent diet-induced obesity in mice

Inappropriate eating habits such as eating late at night are associated with risk for abnormal weight-gain and adiposity. We previously reported that time-imposed feeding during the daytime (inactive phase) induces obesity and metabolic disorders accompanied by physical inactivity in mice. The present study compares metabolic changes induced in mice by time-imposed feeding under voluntary wheel-running […]

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Prevalence of Optimal Metabolic Health in American Adults

Several guidelines for cardiometabolic risk factor identification and management have been released in recent years, but there are no estimates of current prevalence of metabolic health among adults in the United States. We estimated the proportion of American adults with optimal cardiometabolic health, using different guidelines. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey […]

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Genetic Susceptibility for Childhood BMI has no Impact on Weight Loss Following Lifestyle Intervention

This study aimed to investigate the effect of a genetic risk score (GRS) comprising 15 single‐nucleotide polymorphisms, previously shown to associate with childhood BMI, on the baseline cardiometabolic traits and the response to a lifestyle intervention in Danish children and adolescents. Methods Children and adolescents with overweight or obesity (n = 920) and a population‐based control sample […]

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Taking Steps to Better Health

Besides cardiovascular health, the established physical benefits of walking at a moderate pace (about three miles per hour) include: Lessened cancer risk Reduced mental decline, including dementia Lowered chance of heart disease Improved joint function Stronger bones Reduced risk for diabetes Energy boost The benefits of walking extend to mental perks as well. Walking increases the release of […]

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Sitting Is The New Smoking

An alien visitor to our planet would be perplexed by modern human life, not least our relationship with physical exertion. After 6 million years of hunter-gatherer existence, humans can be observed sheltering in warm rooms, counteracting the tiresome effects of earth’s gravity by slouching on comfortable seats in front of glowing screens, being whisked effortlessly […]

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The Toll of America’s Obesity

Beyond the human suffering, diet-related diseases impose massive economic costs. Obesity rates in the United States continue to worsen. So, too, does economic inequality. Are these trends related? After remaining essentially flat in the 1950s and 1960s, the prevalence of obesity doubled in adults and tripled in children between the 1970s and 2000. According to new data from the Centers […]

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Why Butter Is Better

When the fabricated food folks and apologists for the corporate farm realized that they couldn’t block America’s growing interest in diet and nutrition, a movement that would ultimately put an end to America’s biggest and most monopolistic industries, they infiltrated the movement and put a few sinister twists on information going out to the public. […]

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The Toll of America’s Obesity

Beyond the human suffering, diet-related diseases impose massive economic costs. Obesity rates in the United States continue to worsen. So, too, does economic inequality. Are these trends related? After remaining essentially flat in the 1950s and 1960s, the prevalence of obesity doubled in adults and tripled in children between the 1970s and 2000. According to new data from the Centers […]

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We’re in a new age of obesity. How did it happen?

Hypotheses abound concerning the origins of the global obesity epidemic. Genetic predisposition, maternal obesity, excessive maternal weight gain, diabetes, tobacco use during pregnancy, and prenatal exposure to obesogens or endocrine disruptors have all been implicated. An international survey of more than 300 policymakers reported that more than 90% believed personal motivation was a strong or very […]

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Effects of Vitamin K2 on Osteoporosis

Vitamin K2 is a cofactor of γ-carboxylase, which converts the glutamic acid (Glu) residue in osteocalcin molecules to γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla), and is, therefore, essential for γ-carboxylation of osteocalcin. Available evidence suggests that vitamin K2 also enhances osteocalcin accumulation in the extracellular matrix of osteoblasts in vitro. Osteocalcin-knockout mice develop hyperostosis, suggesting that the Gla-containing […]

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