An Evolutionary and Mechanistic Perspective on Dietary Carbohydrate Restriction in Cancer Prevention

The confluence of basic cell biochemistry, epidemiological and anthropologic evidence points to high dietary carbohydrate and the associated disruption of the glucose-insulin axis as causes of the current increase in metabolic disorders, metabolic syndrome, hypertension and cardiovascular disease. This hyperinsulinemic state likely contributes, as well, to an increased mutagenic microenvironment, with increased risk for cancer. […]

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The effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-glycemic index diet on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus

Dietary carbohydrate is the major determinant of postprandial glucose levels, and several clinical studies have shown that low-carbohydrate diets improve glycemic control. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a diet lower in carbohydrate would lead to greater improvement in glycemic control over a 24-week period in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes […]

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Beyond weight loss: a review of the therapeutic uses of very-low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) diets

Very-low-carbohydrate diets or ketogenic diets have been in use since the 1920s as a therapy for epilepsy and can, in some cases, completely remove the need for medication. From the 1960s onwards they have become widely known as one of the most common methods for obesity treatment. Recent work over the last decade or so […]

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Long-term effects of a ketogenic diet in obese patients

Although various studies have examined the short-term effects of a ketogenic diet in reducing weight in obese patients, its long-term effects on various physical and biochemical parameters are not known. To determine the effects of a 24-week ketogenic diet (consisting of 30 g carbohydrate, 1 g/kg body weight protein, 20% saturated fat, and 80% polyunsaturated […]

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Is the restricted ketogenic diet a viable alternative to the standard of care for managing malignant brain cancer?

Malignant brain cancer persists as a major disease of morbidity and mortality. The failure to recognize brain cancer as a disease of energy metabolism has contributed in large part to the failure in management. As long as brain tumor cells have access to glucose and glutamine, the disease will progress. The current standard of care provides brain tumors with access to glucose and glutamine. […]

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Twelve-Month Outcomes of A Randomized Trial of A Moderate-Carbohydrate Versus Very Low-Carbohydrate Diet in Overweight Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus or Prediabetes

Dietary treatment is important in management of type 2 diabetes or prediabetes, but uncertainty exists about the optimal diet. We randomized adults (n = 34) with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) > 6.0% and elevated body weight (BMI > 25) to a very low-carbohydrate ketogenic (LCK) diet (n = 16) or a moderate-carbohydrate, calorie-restricted, low-fat (MCCR) diet (n = 18). All participants were encouraged to be physically […]

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A Link Between the Digestive System and Problems with Sleep

When we lie awake at night, unable to sleep, we usually blame stress, depression, anxiety, adrenaline or the memory of something stupid we said in 2003. But what if our guts were actually the culprit? What if the trillions of microbes sitting in our small intestines – known collectively as the microbiome or microbiota – […]

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Associations between Adipokines and Obesity-Related Cancer

The majority of breast cancers require action of oestrogens for their growth and progression. In addition, leptin in excess may also contribute to the pathogenesis of breast cancer. Vona-Davies and Rose summarises the contradictory results found in case-control studies (one of which was nested within a prospective study), with 3/10 showing positive correlations (55). More […]

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Link between diabetes and cancer risk firmly established

That diabetes and cancer are linked in some way is by no means a new idea, but it had never previously been confirmed. Now, a major new study draws a firm conclusion: diabetes raises a person’s risk of developing cancer. New research warns that the risk of cancer is sex-specific in people with diabetes, and […]

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