Nutritional Ketosis Increases Endurance Performance in Athletes

Ketosis, the metabolic response to energy crisis, is a mechanism to sustain life by altering oxidative fuel selection. Often overlooked for its metabolic potential, ketosis is poorly understood outside of starvation or diabetic crisis. CELL: Nutritional Ketosis Alters Fuel Preference and Thereby Endurance Performance in Athletes Thus, we studied the biochemical advantages of ketosis in […]

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A Global Food Revolution

Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt is a Swedish medical doctor based in Karlstad who specialises in family medicine He is primarily interested in how food and lifestyle can improve a patient’s health and reduce their medication needs. In 2007, Dr. Eenfeldt started the blog “Kostdoktorn” – a Swedish word that means “Diet Doctor”. The goal was to […]

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How Breakfast Became “The Most Important Meal of The Day”

What you may not know is the origin of this ode to breakfast: a 1944 marketing campaign launched by Grape Nuts manufacturer General Foods to sell more cereal.  During the campaign, which marketers named “Eat a Good Breakfast—Do a Better Job”, grocery stores handed out pamphlets that promoted the importance of breakfast while radio advertisements […]

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It Was Easier To Stay Skinny in The 80s

The 2015 study looked at the diets of 36,400 people between 1971 and 2008 and the physical activity data of 14,419 people between 1988 and 2006. 96FM: Why It Was Easier To Stay Skinny in The 80s They grouped the data sets together by the amount of food and activity, age, and BMI. Here’s what they found: […]

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Why Calorie Counts Are All Wrong

Digestion is far too messy a process to accurately convey in neat numbers. The counts on food labels can differ wildly from the calories you actually extract, for many reasons. Scientific American: Science Reveals Why Calorie Counts Are All Wrong Almost every packaged food today features calorie counts in its label. Most of these counts […]

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Briefly Standing, or Being Active, Reduces Blood Sugar

The researchers studied overweight or obese adults who wore continuous blood sugar monitors and blood pressure monitors during their regular, mostly-sitting eight-hour workday. One week later, participants gradually replaced some of that sitting time with standing, in intervals of 10 to 30 minutes for a total of two and half hours per day. Scientific American: […]

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