High cholesterol may protect against infections and atherosclerosis

According to the modified ‘response to injury’ hypothesis of atherogenesis, there are at least two pathways leading to the inflammatory and proliferative lesions of the arterial intima. The first involves monocyte and platelet interaction induced by hypercholesterolaemia. The second pathway involves direct stimulation of the endothelium by a number of factors, including smoking, the metabolic consequences […]

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Substantial and Sustained Improvements in Blood Pressure, Weight and Lipid Profiles from a Carbohydrate Restricted Diet: An Observational Study of Insulin Resistant Patients in Primary Care

Hypertension is the second biggest known global risk factor for disease after poor diet; perhaps lifestyle interventions are underutilized? In a previous small pilot study, it was found that a low carbohydrate diet was associated with significant improvements in blood pressure, weight, ‘deprescribing’ of medications and lipid profiles. We were interested to investigate if these […]

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Dr. David Diamond – ‘An Assessment of Cardiovascular Risks of a Low Carbohydrate, High Fat Diet’

David. M. Diamond received his Ph.D. in Biology in 1985, with a specialization in Behavioral Neuroscience, from the Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory at the University of California, Irvine. He is a professor in the Departments of Psychology and Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology at the University of South Florida, where he has […]

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Sugar: The Bitter Truth

Watch “The Skinny on Obesity” with Dr. Lustig: http://www.uctv.tv/skinny-on-obesity Robert H. Lustig, MD, UCSF Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Endocrinology, explores the damage caused by sugary foods. He argues that fructose (too much) and fiber (not enough) appear to be cornerstones of the obesity epidemic through their effects on insulin. Series: UCSF Mini […]

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Disease-Causing Effects of High Carbohydrate Diets

Whilst evidence accumulates that high carbohydrate diets are associated with increased rates of obesity and diabetes, there is growing evidence that a range of other conditions including dementia and cancer may also have their origins in high carbohydrate diets. In this presentation I will present the scientific evidence as it currently is, linking high carbohydrate […]

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The Impact of Dietary Changes in the Context of Modern Medicine

Medical talk will be around diet in the context of treatments of heart disease. Main topics to be covered: 1. Coronary stents, 2. Statins (primary and secondary prevention) 3. Communication of risk/informed consent 4. WHO figures on CVD 5. Smoking and heart disease 6. Saturated fat and heart disease 7. Tom Frieden’s CDC-health impact pyramid […]

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The Impact of Dietary Changes in the Context of Modern Medicine

Medical talk will be around diet in the context of treatments of heart disease. Main topics to be covered: 1. Coronary stents, 2. Statins (primary and secondary prevention) 3. Communication of risk/informed consent 4. WHO figures on CVD 5. Smoking and heart disease 6. Saturated fat and heart disease 7. Tom Frieden’s CDC-health impact pyramid […]

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The Nutritional Benefits of Grass Fed Butter

Dr. Berg talks about the nutritional benefits of grass-fed butter. BENEFITS: 1. Essential fatty acids 2. Fat-soluble vitamins – K2 (takes calcium out of the soft tissues and arteries. Vitamin A is also good in the immune system, the eyes, and the skin. 3. CLA (conjugated linoleic acid) – great for cardiovascular system and weight […]

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Heart Disease Associated with Processed Carbohydrate Consumption

To clarify the role of dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index (GI), and glycemic load (GL) in progression from health to coronary heart disease (CHD) by determining disease-nutrient risk relation (RR) values needed for intake ranges within jurisdictions and across the globe. We performed a literature search of MEDLINE and EMBASE for prospective cohort studies that used […]

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