A Sweet Addiction

Processed junk foods have a powerful effect on the “reward” centers in the brain, involving brain neurotransmitters like dopamine. The foods that seem to be the most problematic include typical “junk foods,” as well as foods that contain either sugar or wheat, or both. Food addiction is not about a lack of willpower or anything […]

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Priming Effects of Television Food Advertising on Eating Behavior

Health advocates have focused on the prevalence of advertising for calorie-dense low-nutrient foods as a significant contributor to the obesity epidemic. This research tests the hypothesis that exposure to food advertising during television viewing may also contribute to obesity by triggering automatic snacking of available food. PMC: Priming Effects of Television Food Advertising on Eating […]

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“A Calorie Is A Calorie”

The principle of “a calorie is a calorie,” that weight change in hypocaloric diets is independent of macronutrient composition, is widely held in the popular and technical literature, and is frequently justified by appeal to the laws of thermodynamics. We review here some aspects of thermodynamics that bear on weight loss and the effect of […]

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Why Almost Everything You’ve Been Told About Unhealthy Foods Is Wrong

Could eating too much margarine be bad for your critical faculties? The “experts” who so confidently advised us to replace saturated fats, such as butter, with polyunsaturated spreads, people who presumably practice what they preach, have suddenly come over all uncertain and seem to be struggling through a mental fog to reformulate their script. Business […]

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Alternate-Day Fasting and Chronic Disease Prevention

Calorie restriction (CR) and alternate-day fasting (ADF) represent 2 different forms of dietary restriction. Although the effects of CR on chronic disease prevention were reviewed previously, the effects of ADF on chronic disease risk have yet to be summarized. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition: Alternate-day fasting and chronic disease prevention: a review of human […]

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Food Withdrawal Is an Important Tumor Suppressor

Tumor suppressors stop healthy cells from becoming cancerous. Researchers from Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the Medical University of Graz and the German Institute of Human Nutrition in Potsdam-Rehbruecke have found that p53, one of the most important tumor suppressors, accumulates in liver after food withdrawal. They also show that p53 in liver plays a crucial […]

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Meal Frequency and Energy Balance

Several epidemiological studies have observed an inverse relationship between people’s habitual frequency of eating and body weight, leading to the suggestion that a ‘nibbling’ meal pattern may help in the avoidance of obesity. Publimed: Meal frequency and energy balance. A review of all pertinent studies shows that, although many fail to find any significant relationship, […]

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Increased Meal Frequency and Weight Loss

There have been reports of an inverse relationship between meal frequency (MF) and adiposity. It has been postulated that this may be explained by favourable effects of increased MF on appetite control and possibly on gut peptides as well. Publimed: Increased meal frequency does not promote greater weight loss in subjects who were prescribed an […]

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Low-Salt Diet Increases Insulin Resistance

Low-salt (LS) diet activates the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous systems, both of which can increase insulin resistance (IR). We investigated the hypothesis that LS diet is associated with an increase in IR in healthy subjects. Metabolism: Low-salt diet increases insulin resistance in healthy subjects Healthy individuals were studied after 7 days of LS diet (urine […]

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Behavioral and Neurochemical Effects of Intermittent, Excessive Sugar Intake

Evidence for sugar addiction: Behavioral and neurochemical effects of intermittent, excessive sugar intake. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews. The experimental question is whether or not sugar can be a substance of abuse and lead to a natural form of addiction. Publimed: Evidence for sugar addiction: behavioral and neurochemical effects of intermittent, excessive sugar intake. “Food addiction” […]

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