The case for low carbohydrate diets in diabetes management

A low fat, high carbohydrate diet in combination with regular exercise is the traditional recommendation for treating diabetes. Compliance with these lifestyle modifications is less than satisfactory, however, and a high carbohydrate diet raises postprandial plasma glucose and insulin secretion, thereby increasing risk of CVD, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity and diabetes. Moreover, the current epidemic of […]

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Sugar, Processed Food, and Obesity – Sugar Is In Everything – Robert Lustig MD

Sugar, Processed Food, & Obesity: Sugar Is In Everything – Robert Lustig, M.D. It’s increasingly hard to eat less sugar, as market shelves are filled with sugary products. In the past ten years alone, global sugar intake has risen by ten percent. In what’s not the first and surely not the last appeal of the […]

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Reduced Risk of Dementia in Elderly Tied to Higher Cholesterol Levels

Total cholesterol and cognition associations differ in studies at different outcome ages. Some associations of cholesterol with cognition diminish as outcome age increases. In the oldest-old, some relationships reverse from younger elderly samples. Studies seeking protection should focus on good cognition despite high risk. Some associations of high total cholesterol with dementia risk diminish as […]

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Carbohydrate Restriction has a More Favorable Impact on the Metabolic Syndrome than a Low Fat Diet

We recently proposed that the biological markers improved by carbohydrate restriction were precisely those that define the metabolic syndrome (MetS), and that the common thread was regulation of insulin as a control element. We specifically tested the idea with a 12‐week study comparing two hypocaloric diets (~1,500 kcal): a carbohydrate‐restricted diet (CRD) (%carbohydrate:fat:protein = 12:59:28) […]

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KetoNutrition: From Science to Application

An impressive body of scientific evidence over the last 15 years documents long term benefits of carbohydrate-restricted, especially ketogenic, diets. We now understand molecular mechanisms and why they work. Popular books and articles now challenge the advice ‘carbohydrates are good and fats are bad.’ Circa mid-19th century urinary ketones were identified in diabetics sealing their […]

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Association Between Ultraprocessed Food Consumption and Risk of Mortality

Question  Is high consumption of ultraprocessed food associated with an increase in overall mortality risk? Findings  In this cohort study of 44 551 French adults 45 years or older, a 10% increase in the proportion of ultraprocessed food consumption was statistically significantly associated with a 14% higher risk of all-cause mortality. Meaning  An increase in ultraprocessed food consumption may […]

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Ultra-Processed Diets Cause Excess Calorie Intake and Weight Gain

We investigated whether ultra-processed foods affect energy intake in20 weight-stable adults, aged (mean±SE) 31.2±1.6y and BMI=27±1.5kg/m2. Subjects were admitted to the NIH Clinical Center and randomized to receive either ultra-processed or unprocessed diets for 2 weeks immediately followed by the alternate diet for 2 weeks. Meals were designed to be matched for presented calories, energy […]

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Inflammation, Nutritional Ketosis and Metabolic Disease

Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of conditions — increased blood pressure, high blood sugar, excess body fat around the waist, and abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels — that occur together, increasing your risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes

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Dietary carbohydrates: role of quality and quantity in chronic disease

Carbohydrate is the only macronutrient with no established minimum requirement. Although many populations have thrived with carbohydrate as their main source of energy, others have done so with few if any carbohydrate containing foods throughout much of the year (eg, traditional diets of the Inuit, Laplanders, and some Native Americans). If carbohydrate is not necessary […]

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